YouTube: Job or Hobby?

According to YouTube, over 6 billion hours of video are watched on the website every month.

To put that into perspective, that’s equivalent to almost an hour for every person on the planet.

First of all, this means there are a lot of people out there right now watching cat videos. Secondly, and more importantly, it means the potential audience for any online video is huge.

Whilst this may be bad news for anybody who’s recently slipped over or otherwise failed with a camera pointing their way, there’s no denying it’s excellent news for any creatives using YouTube as a platform.

Should creating YouTube videos ever be considered a full time job, or will it always just be a stepping stone to other things? Tube Chum delves deeper. 

 

YouTube is a job.

With a potential audience bigger than any physically present audience could be, it’s easy to see how making videos could be seen as a job for many popular content creators.

There are a couple of options when it comes to making money on the website, and the main one (arguably) would be to utilise adverts.

We all know deep down that adverts are still the most annoying thing to ever happen to the internet.

It’s no secret that we all hate being subjected to YouTube adverts, but the money-making opportunity they present often ends up proving too tempting for creators, and let’s be honest, who are we to complain if they enable our favourite YouTubers to keep doing what they do?

Fifa YouTuber KSI recently showed off his new London flat. Not bad for a YouTuber, eh?

That won’t stop us complaining of course, because we all know deep down that adverts are still the most annoying thing to ever happen to the internet, with the possible exception of the ‘Keep Calm and Carry On’ parody images craze. Dark days indeed. Anyway, let’s get back on topic.

If you’ve dedicated views to your channel with the potential to make (in some cases) a healthy living allowance, why not consider focusing purely on that and making that your full time job?

Indeed, many have done just that and found success. Surely this is fact enough to establish that creating content for YouTube could be considered a viable full time job?

 

YouTube is a hobby.

There are a couple of reasons I can think of as to why people would argue creating content for YouTube should only ever be considered a hobby.

One of these is the simple fact that things change. What is popular today may not be tomorrow, so is it really sensible to base your job around something that relies on keeping people interested?

What if the audience you’re leaning on for your income shuffles off and leaves you in the metaphorical wilderness? (A dark, scary place mostly populated by former internet memes and people doing the Harlem Shake. Eurgh).

ArdenThumb

Arden Rose (above) has used YouTube as a platform to share her hobby with subscribers.

Remember, YouTubers do have a habit of branching out from the website. Whilst YouTube is the foundation of a career for many, you’d be hard-pressed to find somebody who considers creating videos their full time job who isn’t engaged in at least one other money-making venture.

What if the audience you’re leaning on for your income shuffles off and leaves you in the metaphorical wilderness?

Often, these types use their established fanbase to draw attention to other, non video-related projects.

 

My thoughts.

The internet’s opinion on this matter seems to sway back and forth more than Hannah Hart at the end of an episode of My Drunk Kitchen.

Personally, I seem to be leaning towards the job argument, but am still unsure as to whether it would make a suitable solitary job for an extended period of time, as creating relevant and well received content through a singular creative medium must be incredibly tough for more than a short while.

The fact remains, however, that difficulties aside, it’s technically possible to make a living from creating videos and uploading them to YouTube.

The internet’s opinion on this matter seems to sway back and forth more than Hannah Hart at the end of an episode of My Drunk Kitchen.

Whilst many may raise one eyebrow questioningly at how contributing to a website could be considered a job, I believe YouTube has made it possible for the people who are lucky / talented enough to work out a successful video making formula.

I’m very interested to hear what you all think. Should creating YouTube content be considered a viable (if unconventional) job? Otherwise, will it always just be a hobby, at the very most a stepping-stone, to other things and never taken seriously as a job in it’s own right?

Let us know your thoughts on this topic in the comments section below or tweet us at @TubeChum.

Today’s post was written by Tube Chum’s Online Writer, Iain Boswell.

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Tube Chum

Editorial Team at Tube Chum
YouTube news, features, competitions and interviews with the biggest YouTubers in the world. Daily updates from Tube Chum's team of viral video fanatics.
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